Other Ag News:

Friday, January 18, 2019 - 11:46am

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Reana Kovalcik
National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition
202-547-5754, rkovalcik@sustainableagriculture.net 

Latest Attempt by House to Reopen Government Includes Language to Delay Reorganization of Core USDA Research Agencies

NSAC Praises House Effort, Urges Senate to Support Previously Conferenced Appropriations Language

Washington, DC, January 18, 2019 – Yesterday, in the midst of the largely stalemated negotiations to end the partial government shutdown, the House revived previously unpublished conference report language in an effort to move the fiscal year (FY) 2019 appropriations process forward. The report included language that had not been included in the 2018 Senate-passed FY 2019 agriculture appropriations bill, nor the agriculture appropriations bills put forward earlier this year by the House. The specific language expressed concern around the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to relocate and reorganize the Economic Research Service (ERS) and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA).

The report directs USDA to “delay indefinitely” the proposal to reorganize ERS under the Office of the Chief Economist and to provide a “detailed analysis” and cost estimates of the proposed move of both ERS and NIFA. In response to the release of this report, the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC) issued the following statement:

“We are heartened that the House has chosen to address the issue of relocating and reorganizing USDA’s premier research and statistics agencies head-on,” said Nichelle Harriott, NSAC Policy Specialist. “This latest report language asks all the right questions when it comes to the uninformed and unjustified decision to relocate ERS and NIFA – given that this language comes directly from last year’s bicameral efforts to pass a FY 2019 agriculture appropriations bill, we hope the Senate will consider the bill and finally allow the appropriations process to move forward.”

“Many leaders within the research, scientific, and agriculture communities have raised repeated concerns about this reorganization and relocation, including NSAC,” said Harriot. “We applaud policymakers in the House for acknowledging those very justified concerns, and for addressing this issue as one of their first actions of the year. We are hopeful that the 116th Congress can provide the necessary oversight to prevent the Administration from advancing a unilateral and hastily made decision. As the negotiations to reopen the federal government move forward, we urge both House and Senate leaders to stand together against this decision to relocate and reorganize ERS and NIFA until the serious concerns raised by stakeholders across the country can be fully addressed.”

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About the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC):
The National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition is a grassroots alliance that advocates for federal policy reform supporting the long-term social, economic, and environmental sustainability of agriculture, natural resources, and rural communities. Learn more and get involved at: http://sustainableagriculture.net

The post COMMENT: Latest Attempt by House to Reopen Government Includes Language to Delay Reorganization of Core USDA Research Agencies appeared first on National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition.

Friday, January 18, 2019 - 9:06am
Will the grain markets continue to rally?
Thursday, January 17, 2019 - 3:17pm
Oliver Sloup shares his thoughts on the grain and livestock markets in his weekly "2 Minute Drill"
Thursday, January 17, 2019 - 8:58am
Will the relief rally hold?
Wednesday, January 16, 2019 - 9:01am
Is there more downside risk to the grain markets?
Wednesday, January 16, 2019 - 8:00am

The Cornell Small Farms Program’s 2018-2019 season of online courses is well underway, and it’s already time to register for our final block of courses!

Register now to learn about business management, soil health, specialty mushrooms, beekeeping, business plans, high tunnels, and grazing. Courses fill up quickly and registration closes for block four in just one month.

Block Four Courses Start the Week of February 25

Registration closes for block four on Sunday, February 17 at 11:59 p.m. EST.
We strongly encourage you to register early to avoid being shut out of courses.

Taking Care of Business
This course helps aspiring and beginning farmers assess and manage a variety of risks that a farmer will face as they operate their enterprise. Throughout the six-week period, topics essential for operating a viable farm business will be discussed, including insurance coverage, types of business structures, and tax information.

 

Soil Health
The health and productivity of the soil forms the basis for any farm’s success, profitability, and ecological sustainability. Successful farmers need to develop a holistic approach to preserving and building soil health and fertility. Stewardship of the soil is arguably the most important job of any farmer or gardener.

 

 

Indoor Specialty Mushroom Cultivation
Mushrooms are an emerging niche crop with many benefits and offer a unique and highly desired product. This course trains new and experienced farmers in the background, techniques, and economics of farm scale indoor commercial production.

 

 

Introduction to Beekeeping
Whether you are currently keeping honey bees, or are considering adding them to your farm, a basic understanding of bee biology, diseases, pests and setting up your colony for success are essential. This course is taught by experienced beekeepers and will give you real-world experiences paired with academic concepts.

 

Writing a Business Plan
Whether you intend to borrow money or not, heading into a farm venture without a business plan is like setting out on a long-distance journey without a map. Arm yourself with a business plan to aid your farm decision-making and demonstrate to yourself and your family that your ideas are feasible.

 

 

Season Extension with High Tunnels
Adding weeks to either end of your growing season can mean attaining a premium for having products available well before (or long after) other local growers. The unheated plastic-covered “high tunnels” can cost a lot of money, and they bring special management considerations that need to be understood in order to be profitable additions to your farm.

 

Grazing Management
With sound grazing management, you can reduce your workload, keep your animals happier and healthier, and improve the overall productivity and profitability of your farm. Well-managed grazing systems also provide greater environmental benefits and enhance habitat for many wildlife species.

 

 

The Small Farms Program offers more than 20 courses to help farmers improve their technical and business skills. Most courses are six weeks long, and each week features an evening webinar with follow-up readings, videos, and activities. Students and their instructors connect through online forums and live chat. If you aren’t able to attend the webinars in real-time, they are always recorded for later viewing.

You can check out the listings on our site for more information on a particular course and the instructors. Course tuition entitles two people from a farm to attend. Learn more about registration, payment, computer requirements, and more on our Frequently Asked Questions page.

If you still have questions, you can contact our online course managers:

Erica Frenay at ejf5@cornell.edu
Steve Gabriel at sfg53@cornell.edu

Wednesday, January 16, 2019 - 8:00am

The Cornell Small Farms Program’s 2018-2019 season of online courses is well underway, and it’s already time to register for our final block of courses!

Register now to learn about business management, soil health, specialty mushrooms, beekeeping, business plans, high tunnels, and grazing. Courses fill up quickly and registration closes for block four in just one month.

Block Four Courses Start the Week of February 25

Registration closes for block four on Sunday, February 17 at 11:59 p.m. EST.
We strongly encourage you to register early to avoid being shut out of courses.

Taking Care of Business
This course helps aspiring and beginning farmers assess and manage a variety of risks that a farmer will face as they operate their enterprise. Throughout the six-week period, topics essential for operating a viable farm business will be discussed, including insurance coverage, types of business structures, and tax information.

 

Soil Health
The health and productivity of the soil forms the basis for any farm’s success, profitability, and ecological sustainability. Successful farmers need to develop a holistic approach to preserving and building soil health and fertility. Stewardship of the soil is arguably the most important job of any farmer or gardener.

 

 

Indoor Specialty Mushroom Cultivation
Mushrooms are an emerging niche crop with many benefits and offer a unique and highly desired product. This course trains new and experienced farmers in the background, techniques, and economics of farm scale indoor commercial production.

 

 

Introduction to Beekeeping
Whether you are currently keeping honey bees, or are considering adding them to your farm, a basic understanding of bee biology, diseases, pests and setting up your colony for success are essential. This course is taught by experienced beekeepers and will give you real-world experiences paired with academic concepts.

 

Writing a Business Plan
Whether you intend to borrow money or not, heading into a farm venture without a business plan is like setting out on a long-distance journey without a map. Arm yourself with a business plan to aid your farm decision-making and demonstrate to yourself and your family that your ideas are feasible.

 

 

Season Extension with High Tunnels
Adding weeks to either end of your growing season can mean attaining a premium for having products available well before (or long after) other local growers. The unheated plastic-covered “high tunnels” can cost a lot of money, and they bring special management considerations that need to be understood in order to be profitable additions to your farm.

 

Grazing Management
With sound grazing management, you can reduce your workload, keep your animals happier and healthier, and improve the overall productivity and profitability of your farm. Well-managed grazing systems also provide greater environmental benefits and enhance habitat for many wildlife species.

 

 

The Small Farms Program offers more than 20 courses to help farmers improve their technical and business skills. Most courses are six weeks long, and each week features an evening webinar with follow-up readings, videos, and activities. Students and their instructors connect through online forums and live chat. If you aren’t able to attend the webinars in real-time, they are always recorded for later viewing.

You can check out the listings on our site for more information on a particular course and the instructors. Course tuition entitles two people from a farm to attend. Learn more about registration, payment, computer requirements, and more on our Frequently Asked Questions page.

If you still have questions, you can contact our online course managers:

Erica Frenay at ejf5@cornell.edu
Steve Gabriel at sfg53@cornell.edu

Tuesday, January 15, 2019 - 8:59am
Three markets, three different setups
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 - 12:00am
Purdue Extension and Kentucky Extension will present the 2019 Sheep and Goat Webinar on Feb. 13 to offer expert advice to help producers manage their breeding programs.
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 6:32pm
Our daily fundamental and technical livestock analysis.

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NYS Ag & Markets: Wine, Beer & Spirits Summit

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Cattaraugus Counties ... putting knowledge to work